Nativity

The BBC for the last 3 days has been showing a new programme centred on the Nativity.  It’s on at 7pm BBC1 as is truely a fabulous telling of the nativity story and tonight is the last installment.  It’s been written by Tony Jordan who writes for Eastenders and truely shows the power of the story.

On Sunday I heard Tony Jordan being interviewed by Aled Jones – He described the story as ‘the singularly most beautiful story….WOW….’ He decribes the Shepherd as ‘getting the X factor appearance from the shepherd’s and Joseph only gets a dream….surely this should be the other way round….as he wrote this he got it – the Shepherd’s represent us….they represent me.’

All I can say is thank you for scripting this story in such a wonderful and beautiful way!

Waiting for the Homecoming of God (via Godspace)

Some beautiful advent liturgy…

Waiting for the Homecoming of God This evening Tom and I will hold hold our annual Advent party focused not on the birth of Christ two thousand years ago but on that wonderful future coming when Christ will return and we will all come home to the new world that God is creating. Tom has put together a short video with images of coming home from various films – the wonderful introductory soliloquy from Patch Adams – All the world’s people are coming home, followed by that poignant … Read More

via Godspace

Christmas is coming (via Nick Baines’s Blog)

I love this poster it’s really eye catching and Nick Baines’s blog really makes you stop and think about it….

Christmas is coming How predictable! ChurchAds.net comes up with a striking image for the Christmas poster campaign and the responses could have been written before they were given. First, the poster: As I discovered last December, speak about the reality of the original Christmas events and you invite the piling of ordure on your head. After all, they say, who cares if the Nativity narratives of the Gospels get confused with Cinderella and the pantomime stories? Th … Read More

via Nick Baines’s Blog

Why He Came

 
Dear Reverend God,
 
Your private research commission has prepared its final report.
As chair person I must inform you that we are unanimously against your project and for the following reasons:
 
It’s dangerous for your son to become a human being:
he could be hungry, thirsty, suffer or even be killed.
But if you insist, we suggest a few changes and some delay:
 
Jesus must be born from a married woman:
nobody will believe the story of Mary and the angel.
Or he should appear on earth as an adult:
why waste all those growing up years?
Whether Jesus is a boy or a girl,
50% of the people will feel discriminated against.
The birth in the stable is ridiculous:
our commission prefers a palace.
Shepherds should be involved:
they are scorned even by the middle class.
Galilee is a remote province, little esteemed:
Jesus won’t find the right kind of apostles there.
Transportation system is too slow yet:
It’s a long walk from Nazareth to Jerusalem.
Sound systems don’t exist yet:
too few people will hear Jesus’ message.
But the most compelling reason against your plan
is that it has never been done before.
  

And God said:

Thanks to all the members of your commission.

You are very intelligent, and you have discovered very valuable reasons against my project.

But what do your hearts tell you?

Dear Reverend God,
 
You asked us for a study based on scientific facts and rational analysis.
The heart reasons were not part of our mandate.
You are the specialist about the love questions.
 

Good, said God.

I’m glad you feel like this.

Then, let’s go for it.

by Fr. Rene Fumoleau

Calling

I was searching for something today and read this and thought it was worth sharing…

There is an old Christian tradition
that God sends each person into this world
with a special message to deliver,
with a special song to sing for others,
with a special act of love to bestow.
No one else can speak my message,
or sing my song,
or offer my act of love.
These are entrusted only to me.

John Powell, Invitations God’s Calling for Everyone Francis Dewer (The Cromwell Press, 1996) p9.